Wisdom knows no age….

Venice – Bodleian Library.

Back in the 14th century, a Venetian merchant put together a compendium of information practical, scientific, and wise, known as the Zibaldone da Canal. It included the following words of wisdom we would do well to heed today. (Courtesy of Medievalists.net)

These are beautiful words to understand

Courtesy from the mouth is very valuable, and costs little.

The excessive man cannot acquire great things that last long.

Whoever errs and does not believe that he has erred ought to find mercy, but whoever knowingly errs is neither true nor good.

If a man knows in himself that which he sees and knows in other people, I have a firm belief that he will not fail in the end, though at times he may fail grievously.

Who can control himself, it seems to me, rules a very great kingdom.

Good words and evil deeds deceive wise man and fool alike.

These are the three most hopeless things in the world:the first is a poor man, the second is the beauty of a whore, the third is the strength of a fool.

These are three things that are more displeasing to God than any others: the first is for a rich man to be greedy, the second is for a poor man to be arrogant, the third is for an old man to be lascivious.

The wise man says: He who breaks faith will find faith broken.

The wise man says: Whoever shall do well shall have good and shall not know whence it shall come.

If those who wound felt the pain of those who are wounded, they could not often wound with pleasure.

There is a time to climb and at time to descend. And a time to weep and a time to be silent. And there is a time serve those who offend thee. And a time to threaten, not to fear: and at such times a man ought to wait to know the good from the bad, according to which carries the best chance of success.

The wise man has his mouth in his heart, while the fool has his heart in his mouth.

Praise the fool and make him rise.

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2 thoughts on “Wisdom knows no age….

  1. All word lessons one would want to follow.

    I must say I had to read the second to last line several times. My mind kept seeing it wrong. I thought it said the same of the wise man and the fool, until I finally saw the words in the order they appeared. The fool is not a ‘bad’ person in his heart, just in need of guidance. Once I saw what was there, it was a profound last statement, just add: “Praise the fool and make him rise.” If more people were fools instead of so pompous, it would be a better world. jk

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Some are open to interpretation. The last applies to certain GOP types (who shall remain nameless) – if you praise them, they will be elevated even though they are still fools. That makes them dangerous. :-/

    Like

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